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A Summary of the Americans with Disabilities Act 

Courtney King, Attorney


Courtney King serves as an associate attorney at Indianapolis law firm Ice Miller LLP. As a lawyer representing clients in matters of employment and labor law, Courtney King's practice includes matters involving the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Enacted in 1990, the ADA recognizes disability as a physical or mental condition that hinders one’s ability to perform one or more vital living tasks. Also applying to a person having a record of a disability or being regarded as disabled, it has five sections that define its scope.

Title I requires employers to make “reasonable accommodations” to employees and job applicants with disabilities so they can meet work objectives. Such accommodations include adjusting job duties, schedules, policies, or equipment. Title I also outlaws discrimination against individuals with disabilities.

Title II states that public facilities must allow persons with disabilities access to the same services as the able-bodied. For example, buses must be equipped with adaptive boarding devices.

For businesses like stores, hotels, and restaurants, Title III mandates that new or added construction must provide suitable accommodations and that, when possible, barriers to accessibility in existing facilities be removed. Under Title IV, telephone companies must offer services for the deaf, such as TTYs.

Finally, Title V prohibits threats and reprisals for persons using the ADA to remedy discriminatory practices. Companies with questions concerning the ADA should contact a qualified attorney.

Courtney King serves as an associate attorney at Indianapolis law firm Ice Miller LLP. As a lawyer representing clients in matters of employment and labor law, Courtney King's practice includes matters involving the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Enacted in 1990, the ADA recognizes disability as a physical or mental condition that hinders one’s ability to perform one or more vital living tasks. Also applying to a person having a record of a disability or being regarded as disabled, it has five sections that define its scope.

Title I requires employers to make “reasonable accommodations” to employees and job applicants with disabilities so they can meet work objectives. Such accommodations include adjusting job duties, schedules, policies, or equipment. Title I also outlaws discrimination against individuals with disabilities.
Title II states that public facilities must allow persons with disabilities access to the same services as the able-bodied. For example, buses must be equipped with adaptive boarding devices.
For businesses like stores, hotels, and restaurants, Title III mandates that new or added construction must provide suitable accommodations and that, when possible, barriers to accessibility in existing facilities be removed. Under Title IV, telephone companies must offer services for the deaf, such as TTYs.
Finally, Title V prohibits threats and reprisals for persons using the ADA to remedy discriminatory practices. Companies with questions concerning the ADA should contact a qualified attorney.

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